Reconstructive Procedures

The art and science of restoring form & function to the face & body.

The art and science of restoring form & function to the face & body.

The University of Ottawa’s Plastic Surgery Division is renowned nationally and internationally for advancing reconstructive surgery through education, research, and patient care. Faculty members excel in nerve, craniofacial, and breast reconstruction, often presenting at conferences and contributing to new technologies. Services are provided at Ottawa Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), with all surgeons offering emergency services.

BREAST

Sculpting Confidence

Breast reconstruction using the body’s own tissue.

Ottawa patients who wish to reconstruct their breast(s) post-mastectomy without implants can opt for an autologous reconstruction. This method uses skin, fat, and sometimes muscle tissue from elsewhere on the body to reconstruct the breast(s). Areas such as the abdomen, the flanks, buttocks, or inner thighs can be sources of tissue for breast reconstruction. This transfer of tissue from one area of the body to another is called a flap. The transferred tissue is formed into the shape of a breast and stitched into place. In some cases, microsurgery breast reconstruction techniques may be employed to reduce tissue trauma and improve treatment outcomes.

Autologous reconstruction is popular because it is enduring, and uses the body’s own tissues without the need for implants. The harvested tissue can feel similar to breast tissue, making it a good substitute for the breast which has been removed.

The “flap” reconstruction may be performed in conjunction with mastectomy surgery (immediate reconstruction), after mastectomy and other cancer treatments (delayed reconstruction), or within a staged approach that combines both of these methods.

Autologous reconstruction requires longer surgical times and a more extensive healing period as there may be two to four different surgical sites on different areas on the body depending on the individual case. Often, more than one surgery is required to make adjustments to achieve optimal aesthetic outcomes.

BREAST RECONSTRUCTION IS PROVIDED BY THE FOLLOWING SURGEONS:

DR. KIRSTY BOYD
DR. GLORIA ROCKWELL
DR. JING ZHANG

The use of implants to reconstruct the breasts post mastectomy.

Ottawa patients can opt for a breast reconstruction with implants. This technique is a minimally invasive method with shorter surgery times and faster recovery than autologous or microsurgical breast reconstruction. Some patients may be reconstructed with a single surgical procedure while some patients may require several stages to complete the reconstruction. Implants may be a good option for women who do not have enough extra tissue elsewhere on their bodies to perform flap reconstruction.

An implant reconstruction can be performed in conjunction with mastectomy surgery (immediate reconstruction), after mastectomy and other treatments (delayed reconstruction), or a staged approach combining all of these methods. In some cases tissue expansion, or stretching of the remaining skin may be required to accommodate the implant. A surgery to insert a balloon-like expander is performed, and the expander is gradually filled with saline over the course of weeks to stretch the skin. Once expansion is complete, the final implant surgery is performed.

When planning an implant based reconstruction, a plastic surgeon will make the appropriate surgical recommendations to account for the patient’s health, medical history and stage of cancer treatment along with their desired aesthetic outcome.

BREAST SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY THE FOLLOWING SURGEONS:
DR. KIRSTY BOYD
DR. GLORIA ROCKWELL
DR. JING ZHANG
DR. MARIO JARMUSKE

Post-cancer treatment breast reconstruction surgery at the University of Ottawa.

When breast reconstruction surgery is performed as a separate surgical procedure following, mastectomy, lumpectomy surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy or targeted cancer therapies it is called delayed reconstruction. This method may be recommended in order to prevent undesirable changes to the reconstructed breast that are caused by radiation therapy and chemotherapy treatments. There is also the chance that a reconstructed breast may interfere with radiation therapy targeting the area affected by cancer. In the cases where patients are advised to wait until after their cancer treatments are finished, the reconstruction may be delayed by 6 to 12 months after mastectomy or lumpectomy. There is no time limit for breast reconstruction; therefore it can be done years later if so desired.

Delayed reconstruction can be done with many different surgical techniques. These include autologous reconstruction, in which tissue from the body is used to reconstruct the breast. In addition, implants or alloplastic reconstruction may be used. In some cases a combination of different types of techniques is used.

For more detail, please visit Autologous Reconstruction.

BREAST SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY THE FOLLOWING SURGEONS:
DR. KIRSTY BOYD
DR. GLORIA ROCKWELL
DR. JING ZHANG
DR. MARIO JARMUSKE

Mastectomy surgery with breast reconstruction surgery at the University of Ottawa.

When breast reconstruction is performed in conjunction with mastectomy surgery, it is referred to as immediate reconstruction. This surgery offers the patient an immediate return to their familiar form after breast cancer surgeryThe surgery requires the coordination of the oncologic breast surgery and plastic surgery teams. During the operation, once the breast cancer surgeon has removed the breast, the plastic surgeon reconstructs the breast with either an implant or autologous method or a combination thereof. Patient eligibility for immediate reconstruction is determined by the stage of their cancer therapy. In some cases, a surgeon will recommend waiting until after radiation and chemotherapy treatments are finished before starting reconstruction. In some cases partial reconstruction may be recommended immediately with the final reconstruction performed after cancer treatments are completed. An in depth surgical consultation will determine the course of treatment that is most suited to the patient’s needs.

BREAST SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY THE FOLLOWING SURGEONS:
DR. KIRSTY BOYD
DR. GLORIA ROCKWELL
DR. JING ZHANG
DR. MARIO JARMUSKE

Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with microsurgical tissue transfer using perforator flaps.

Microsurgical breast reconstruction represents a state of the art technique to restore a familiar form post-mastectomy. Ottawa patients who opt for microsurgical tissue transfer breast reconstruction undergo a very specialized, complex and lengthy procedure. The surgery involves the use of excess skin and fat (flaps) harvested from areas of the body such as the abdomen (SIEA DIEP and TRAM flap procedures), buttocks (GAP flap) and thighs (PUP flap) to reconstruct the breast. These tissues are removed from their location in the body and transferred to the breast. A microscope is used to join the blood vessels from these tissues to a new location. The blood vessels (perforators) supply nutrients to the tissues at the breast reconstruction site for optimal recovery. These tissues are then shaped to look like a breast. Advances in microsurgical techniques have improved operative success rates to over 95 per cent. This method can also provide outcomes that are both enduring and aesthetically pleasing. An in depth surgical consultation will determine the selection of an appropriate flap for microsurgical breast reconstruction based on the patient’s health, medical history and oncologic factors. These factors will vary based on the availability of donor tissues, cancer stage, and the need for postoperative cancer treatment, as well as the risk of cancer in the other breast.

BREAST SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY THE FOLLOWING SURGEONS:
DR. KIRSTY BOYD
DR. GLORIA ROCKWELL
DR. JING ZHANG
DR. MARIO JARMUSKE

The division’s highly skilled faculty offers services at the Ottawa Hospital, as well as the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO). Each surgeon has their own specialties, however emergency services are provided by all surgeons.

CLEFT LIP AND PALATE

Surgical correction of cleft lip and palate

Cleft lip and cleft palate can occur alone or together.They are caused by abnormal facial development during gestation. The ‘cleft’ is a fissure, opening or gap that results from the non-fusion of the body’s natural structures that form before birth. This is quite common in North America, occurring as often as one in 700 births – fortunately it is readily treated. The surgical correction of cleft lip and palate at the University of Ottawa is led by the Division of Paediatric Plastic Surgery, based at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO). The treatment involves staged surgical and medical interventions that involve a variety of disciplines, including dentistry, oral surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, audiologists, speech language pathologists and paediatricians.

All surgeons participate in the care of Children with a variety of facial differences. In addition, our surgeons often collaborate to provide care in the developing world to children who might not otherwise be treated.

CLEFT LIP AND PALATE SURGERY | PLASTIC SURGEONS
DR. CLAUDIA MALIC
DR. YVONNE YING

Learn more about the work we do at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario

CRANIOFACIAL

Ensuring safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

Craniofacial reconstructive surgery is specific to the cranium and facial skeleton and was developed to manage the problems of facial trauma, tumour surgery post-operative problems.

Sophisticated imaging and computational technology paired with a deeper understanding and knowledge of the anatomy of the craniofacial skeleton have led to the refinement of craniofacial surgical methods. These include custom implants and custom designed bone reconstruction. These advancements – along with the implementation of less invasive techniques – have laid the groundwork for the restoration of the normal framework of the face and optimal healing for natural-looking outcomes. The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery collaborates with the Division of Neurosurgery to establish a craniofacial program. Many other divisons including,Oral Surgery, Ophthalmology and ENT join to provide comprehensive management for craniomaxillofacial issues. In addition, the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery joins the Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery to provide all regional head and neck reconstructions at the Ottawa Hospital.

CRANIOFACIAL SURGERY | PLASTIC SURGEONS
The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in craniofacial reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction. The following is a list of plastic surgeons who perform craniofacial reconstructive surgery.

CRANIOFACIAL RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY:
DR. DANIEL PETERS

Pediatric Craniofacial reconstructive surgery addresses conditions in which a child’s face may be altered as the result of tumors, trauma or birth.

It is a specific subspecialty of pediatric plastic surgery which focusses on restoring form and function to these kids. One example is craniosynostosis. In some children the growth centers of the skull or sutures do not develop correctly. As a result children have differences in skull and facial appearance. Over the past 30 years, sophisticated imaging technology paired with a deeper understanding and knowledge of the anatomy of the craniofacial skeleton have led to the refinement of craniofacial surgical methods. These advancements – along with the implementation of less invasive techniques – have laid the groundwork for the restoration of the normal framework of the face and optimal healing for natural-looking outcomes. The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Ottawa works in cooperation with the Division of Neurosurgery, Oral Surgery and Ophthalmology to provide comprehensive management for craniomaxillofacial issues There is a comprehensive craniofacial team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario which helps manage these children throughout their lives from birth through adulthood.

CRANIOFACIAL SURGERY | PLASTIC SURGEONS
The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in craniofacial reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

CRANIOFACIAL RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY:
DR. DANIEL PETERS

The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in craniofacial reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

HAND SURGERY

Artistry in Form

The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery – in conjunction with the Division of Orthopaedic Surgery – offers a dedicated and active hand surgery program. Hand surgeons require unique and comprehensive training in the treatment of all different tissues including skin, nerves, vessels, tendons, ligaments and bone. The University of Ottawa boasts a leading hand surgery program that is dedicated to research and the further advancement of surgical techniques to address concerns including congenital conditions, skin problems, trauma and pain. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus is designated as the adult Regional Trauma Center to service upper extremity reconstructive surgery. The Rapid Access Plastic Surgery Clinic has opened three procedure rooms and provides on-site hand therapists to allow for prompt patient-focused care. This represents a paradigm shift in the delivery of care to acutely injured patients. Patients can often be assessed on the day of injury, treated using principles of regional anesthesia and discharged without waiting several days for a consultation.

The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in hand reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

HAND SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY:
DR. SARAH SHIGA
DR. BRENT TRULL
DR. KIRSTY BOYD
DR. JING ZHANG
DR. KEVIN CHEUNG (PEDIATRIC)
DR. MARIO JARMUSKE
DR. GLORIA ROCKWELL

MICROSURGERY

Restore form & function

Microsurgery is a field of surgery that utilizes specialized microscope technology and precision instrumentation to facilitate intricate operations on tiny structures. Innovations in microsurgery have had a major impact on the potential to restore form and function to patients impaired by disease, trauma and congenital abnormalities. Microsurgery is an important tool to resolve complex reconstructive surgery problems. The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Ottawa has a strong microsurgery program. Clinical care is provided to patients with tumors, trauma and complex defects. These include reconstructions of the face, breasts, head and neck and extremities. Patients under the care of our plastic surgeons are privy to the latest advancements and techniques in microsurgery for exceptional care and optimal outcomes.

The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in microsurgery methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

MICROSURGERY IS PROVIDED BY THE FOLLOWING SURGEONS:
DR. BRENT TRULL
DR. KIRSTY BOYD
DR. JING ZHANG

NERVE RECONSTRUCTION

Nerve repair, nerve graft, nerve transfer or neurolysis

When the activity of a nerve is disrupted, it can result in functional problems with muscles, loss of sensation and pain. Microsurgical procedures have been developed with the aim to repair and restore function to the nerves. The surgical approach is dictated by the character of the injury and may include nerve repair, nerve graft, nerve transfer or neurolysis. Surgical intervention should be expeditious to prevent irreversible function loss and subsequent innervated muscle function. In the case where nerve repair is not successful, further procedures such as tendon transfer and nerve transfer may be required. The University of Ottawa is at the forefront of nerve reconstruction with the first nerve transfer for spinal cord injury in Canada performed in Ottawa in February of 2015 by Dr. Kirsty Boyd. The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery has initiated an upper extremity/peripheral nerve service in tandem with the Divisions of Rehabilitation Medicine to optimize patient care.

The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in nerve reconstruction surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

NERVE RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY:
DR. KIRSTY BOYD

PEDIATRIC SURGERY

Committed to high quality patient care, education and research.

The Division of Pediatric Surgery is based at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and currently consists of four faculty members committed to high quality patient care, education and research. The CHEO team provides care for many children including those with:
  • Cleft lip and palate
  • Craniofacial conditions
  • Congenital hand conditions
  • Vascular anomalies
  • Burns

Craniofacial surgery at the University of Ottawa

Pediatric Craniofacial reconstructive surgery addresses conditions in which a child’s face may be altered as the result of tumors, trauma or birth. It is a specific subspecialty of pediatric plastic surgery which focusses on restoring form and function to these kids. One example is craniosynostosis. In some children the growth centers of the skull or sutures do not develop correctly. As a result children have differences in skull and facial appearance. Over the past 30 years, sophisticated imaging technology paired with a deeper understanding and knowledge of the anatomy of the craniofacial skeleton have led to the refinement of craniofacial surgical methods. These advancements – along with the implementation of less invasive techniques – have laid the groundwork for the restoration of the normal framework of the face and optimal healing for natural-looking outcomes. The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Ottawa works in cooperation with the Division of Neurosurgery, Oral Surgery and Ophthalmology to provide comprehensive management for craniomaxillofacial issues There is a comprehensive craniofacial team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario which helps manage these children throughout their lives from birth through adulthood.

CRANIOFACIAL SURGERY | PLASTIC SURGEONS
he Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in craniofacial reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

CRANIOFACIAL RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY:
DR. DANIEL PETERS ( PEDIATRIC CRANIOFACIAL SURGERY)

Craniofacial surgery at the University of Ottawa

Pediatric Craniofacial reconstructive surgery addresses conditions in which a child’s face may be altered as the result of tumors, trauma or birth. It is a specific subspecialty of pediatric plastic surgery which focusses on restoring form and function to these kids. One example is craniosynostosis. In some children the growth centers of the skull or sutures do not develop correctly. As a result children have differences in skull and facial appearance. Over the past 30 years, sophisticated imaging technology paired with a deeper understanding and knowledge of the anatomy of the craniofacial skeleton have led to the refinement of craniofacial surgical methods. These advancements – along with the implementation of less invasive techniques – have laid the groundwork for the restoration of the normal framework of the face and optimal healing for natural-looking outcomes. The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Ottawa works in cooperation with the Division of Neurosurgery, Oral Surgery and Ophthalmology to provide comprehensive management for craniomaxillofacial issues There is a comprehensive craniofacial team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario which helps manage these children throughout their lives from birth through adulthood.

CRANIOFACIAL SURGERY | PLASTIC SURGEONS
he Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in craniofacial reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

CRANIOFACIAL RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY IS PROVIDED BY:
DR. CLAUDIA MALIC
DR. YVONNE YING

The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in paediatric reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.
SKIN CANCER

Highest standards of reconstruction

Despite our understanding of the need to protect our skin from the damaging effects of the sun, statistics show that the incidence of skin cancer is on the rise in Canada. Many types of skin cancer including melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are primarily treated through surgical means by plastic reconstructive surgeons, alongside the specialized care of dermatologists and oncologists. The type of skin cancer surgery that is employed will depend on the type of cancer, how large it is, where it is on the body as well as other factors. For cancers with a high risk of spreading, radiation and chemotherapy may also be required. The Division of Plastic Surgery provides the highest standards of reconstruction for patients with skin cancers. These may include flaps or skin grafts based on each patient’s unique needs.

The Faculty of Plastic Surgery at the University of Ottawa employs the latest advancements in skin cancer reconstructive surgical methods to ensure safety, optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction.

FAQ

Post-Operative Care Instructions

Post-Operative Care Instructions

WHAT IS TRIGGER FINGER?
  • Trigger Finger occurs when the tendon that bends your finger becomes inflamed where it travels through a tight tunnel at the base of the finger
WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?
  • When you bend your finger, the inflamed tendon gets caught in the tunnel and can cause the finger to “lock” down
  • Pain
WHAT ARE THE TREATMENTS?
  • Steroid Injections
  • Minor Surgery

Steroid Injection

WHAT IS A STEROID INJECTION?
  • Steroids are medications that decrease inflammation and swelling
  • These are NOT the same steroids that bodybuilders use
  • In some patients, a steroid injection can resolve the trigger finger permanently
  • In other patients, a steroid injection may only resolve the trigger finger temporarily, in which case another injection or surgery would be considered
  • The injection can be done in the clinic the same day as your appointment and takes less than 5 minutes
WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT AFTER THE INJECTION?
  • The area will be sore the next day (base of the finger in the palm) and you may need to take over the counter pain medication such as Tylenol or Advil
  • Symptoms should start to improve within a week. If they do not, another treatment will be considered

Minor Surgery

WHAT DOES THE SURGERY ENTAIL?
  • Surgery is done in the clinic, using freezing medication (local anesthetic) that is injected into the palm to numb the area (similar to going to the dentist and having your tooth frozen before a filling)
  • Surgery takes about 10-20 minutes
  • We make a cut in the palm that is about 1-2cm long and release the tunnel
WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT AFTER SURGERY?
  • You will have a light bandage on the hand that can come off after 48 hours, after which you can get the hand wet in the shower
  • The freezing in your hand may take several hours to wear off
  • You will need to return in 2 weeks to have the stitches removed and the wound checked
PAIN
  • Your hand will be the most sore in the first day or 2 after surgery. It is normal to have swelling of the hand and fingers.
  • To help with swelling and pain, elevate your hand on several pillows as much as possible. Do not walk or sit with your hand dangling down. Use an ice pack at regular intervals.
  • Pain and swelling will gradually decrease. Swelling around the cut, and soreness after heavier use of the hand can last for 3-6 months.
  • Most people only need over the counter pain medications like Tylenol or Advil for pain.
ACTIVITY
  • You can use the hand immediately after surgery for normal activities of daily living
  • Do not soak the hand in a tub or pool for 2 weeks post-surgery
  • You can drive when you feel you have enough finger and wrist movement to do so safely
WORK
  • Most people go back to work within a week or 2 after surgery
  • If you work involves manual labor or heavy lifting, you may need several weeks longer off of work, or to be on light duties if available
Call Your Surgeon If You Experience…
  • Redness and swelling around the cut that gets worst rather than better
  • Pain that is not controlled after following the instructions above
  • Green or yellow drainage from the cut
  • Fever or chills

DR. SARAH SHIGA, MD, FRCSC

Hand, Wrist and Reconstructive Plastic Surgeon
The Ottawa Hospital- Civic Campus
190 Melrose Ave, Ottawa, ON, K1Y 4K7
613-798-5555 ext. 19222

WHAT IS CARPAL TUNNEL?
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when one of the major nerves to the hand (the median nerve) is squeezed or compressed as it travels through a tunnel in the wrist
WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?
  • Tingling or numbness in the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers
  • Pain
  • Weakness of the hand
WHAT ARE THE TREATMENTS?
  • Wearing wrist splints at night to keep the wrists from curling up
  • Minor surgery

Minor Surgery

WHAT DOES THE SURGERY ENTAIL?
  • Surgery is done in the clinic, using freezing medication (local anesthetic) that is injected into the wrist and hand to numb the area (similar to going to the dentist and having your tooth frozen before a filling)
  • Surgery takes about 10-20 minutes
  • We make a cut in the palm that is about 4-6cm long and release the ligament that is compressing the nerve
WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT AFTER SURGERY?
  • You will have a light bandage on the hand that can come off after 48 hours, after which you can get the hand wet in the shower
  • The freezing in your hand may take several hours to wear off
  • You will need to return in 2 weeks to have the stitches removed and the wound checked
PAIN
  • Your hand will be the most sore in the first day or 2 after surgery. It is normal to have swelling of the hand and fingers.
  • To help with swelling and pain, elevate your hand on several pillows as much as possible. Do not walk or sit with your hand dangling down. Use an ice pack at regular intervals.
  • Most people only need over the counter pain medications like Tylenol or Advil for pain
ACTIVITY
  • You can use the hand immediately after surgery for normal activities of daily living
  • Do not lift anything heavier than a coffee mug for 2 weeks post-surgery
  • You can drive when you feel you have enough finger and wrist movement to do so safely
AFTER THE FIRST 2 WEEKS
  • Pain and swelling will gradually decrease. Swelling around the cut, and soreness after heavier use of the hand can last for 3-6 months.
  • Begin to massage the scar using pain lotion or oil for 5 minutes several times a day. This helps break down scar tissue and prevents painful sensitivity of the scar.
Call Your Surgeon If You Experience…
  • Redness and swelling around the cut that gets worst rather than better
  • Pain that is not controlled after following the instructions above
  • Green or yellow drainage from the cut
  • Fever or chills

DR. SARAH SHIGA, MD, FRCSC

Hand, Wrist and Reconstructive Plastic Surgeon
The Ottawa Hospital- Civic Campus
190 Melrose Ave, Ottawa, ON, K1Y 4K7
613-798-5555 ext. 19222

Dressings
  • Following surgery, leave all of your dressings dry and intact
  • Remove all tape and gauze from your breasts on Sunday morning
  • Please leave the steri-strips (white stickers), which I have applied directly over your incisions intact; they will eventually fall off on their own
  • No additional dressings are required
  • Do not place any creams, moisturizers, oils, peroxide etc… on or near your incisions
Showers
  • Once your dressings have been removed, please shower daily using mild soap and water
  • Any soap is ok, but, avoid fragrances
  • Gently cleanse your breasts using your hands; do not scrub your breasts/incisions
  • Do not avoid cleaning over steri-strips; it is ok to get them wet
  • It is ok if your steri-strips peel and fall off in the shower and your incisions get wet
Bras
  • You may wear a sports bra if this provides you with comfort
  • Please do not wear an underwire bra as it will put pressure on your healing incisions
Activity
  • No strenuous activity (nothing that will increase your blood pressure) for 4 weeks
  • No lifting greater than 5 pounds for 4 weeks
Follow-up 

You will see Dr. Momtazi in followup on _______ at _______ in Module K at the General Campus.

For any urgent concerns outside of regular office hours, please call 613.737.8899, inform the operator that you are Dr. Momtazi’s patient and ask to speak with the plastic surgeon on call.

MOEIN MOMTAZI, MD MSC FRCSC

The Ottawa Hospital – General Campus
501 Smyth Road, Room M2569-A, Box 213
Ottawa, ON K1H 8L6
P (613) 737-8899 ext.
The first three days:
  • Expect drainage from the incisions
  • Yellow colored drainage tinged with blood is normal Green and smelly is not; Fever is not
  • Small openings along incision line are normal, usually at the T junction they will close up on their own, you can use sanitary napkins to cover these areas
  • You may shower over the tapes, pat dry and leave tapes on until your next appointment: DO NOT take tapes off : They will fall off on their own -Use ANY Anti Bacterial Soap for cleansing
  • Put a thin layer of Polysporin or Vaseline over incisions
  • Avoid laying flat: elevate the head of your bed
  • Avoid straining and lifting or reaching over your head
  • Avoid alcohol
  • No smoking
  • Rest, Rest ****
  • Take your pain medication when you need it Suffering will only increase your blood pressure and provoke bleeding
  • You can use an ice pack to lay over chest for swelling and or pain
  • After the initial dressing is removed (3 to 4 days post surgery) You will need to wear a sports bra for support…..Try to wear sports bra as much as possible for 3 weeks
ITEMS YOU WILL NEED:

Any Antibacterial Soap Q-Tips, Polysporin or Vaseline ointment, PAPER Tape (DOLLAR TREE) Sanitary Napkins Sports bra- To be bought 2 WEEKs AFTER SURGERY

Cleansing

For patients with sutures, you can wash the wound with soap and water. Please dry carefully with a clean towel and avoid rubbing the fresh wound.  You can do this 1-2 times daily.

Apply a thin layer of Vaseline over the stitches. You may shower as usual. Do not bath or go swimming until the sutures have been removed.

If you leave with bandages that are stitched to the wound (ie. stitched to a skin graft) please avoid washing the wound and leave the dressing alone. You can apply a thin layer of Vaseline to the edges of the dressing twice daily.

If you have steri-strips on the wound with dissolving sutures underneath, you can wash the wound as normal but are not required to apply Vaseline. Please leave the steri-strips intact until they fall off.

Swelling and Bruising

If you had surgery on your face, you may experience swelling and/or bruising in one or both eyes. The severity and duration of this swelling will depend on proximity to your eyes and the extent of the surgery.

Most people experience swelling on the morning following surgery. This typically lasts for approximately 3-5 days. Be sure to sleep with you head elevated (2-3 pillows). Do not apply ice directly on the wound.

Bleeding

Bleeding from the site is common for 24-48 hours after surgery. Apply firm pressure with a new Kleenex/tissue for 10-15 minutes. This should stop the bleeding.

If you take blood thinning medication, bleeding can last the 48 hours. If the bleeding doesn’t stop, call the office or go to the closest emergency department.

Infection

Some patients will get a wound infection from this type of surgery. You should contact our office if you experience any of the following for more than 24 hours:

  1. Redness that extends more than 1 cm from the edge of the wound
  2. Draining from the wound that is green or foul smelling (clear or straw coloured draining is normal)
  3. Fever
  4. Feeling unwell with chills or sweating
  5. Pain around the wound associated with increased temperature of the wound (hot to the touch)
Pathology Results

The results from the pathology can take 2-3 weeks. You should book an appointment for pathology results on the day of your surgery. If you are unable to do so, please call the clinic at 613-761-4025 ext. 3. Results are usually provided in person to ensure continuity of care.

You may be asked to call the office directly after 3 weeks 613-798-5555 ext. 13712. Pathology is provided over the phone only to patients who reside out of town and to those with mobility issues.

Follow-up appointment

If you have sutures which require removal, you will be seen in 1 week for facial surgery and in 2 weeks for surgery in other areas of the body. If your sutures dissolve, you will be seen in 3 weeks in order to receive pathology results.

If you need to change this appointment, call the clinic at 613-761-4025 ext. 3.